Francis Stewart is the Implicit Religion Research Fellow, a Lecturer, and Director of the Edward Bailey Research Center for the Study of Implicit Religion at Bishop Grosseteste University. She currently teaches at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels in the Theology, Philosophy and Ethics department. She also provides training for doctoral students throughout the university. She takes applications for doctoral supervision in relation to Implicit Religion; religion and popular culture; religion and music; religion and sound; subcultural studies; religion and punk; punk rock. 

Her academic background is in the discipline of sociology of religion, with a particular focus on the critical examination of religious and secular categories of definition through an exploration of aspects of punk rock. She received her PhD in 2011 from the University of Stirling. Her thesis was the first sociological overview of Straight Edge punk in the UK and Ireland, and the first examination of the connections between Straight Edge and religion. These were published by Routledge in “Punk Rock is my Religion: Straight Edge Punk and ‘Religious’ Identity.”(2017)

She is a steering group member of the Punk Scholars Network which holds long-standing commitment towards the nurturing of research; not only in terms of post-doctoral output, but also through pedagogical and academic support for postgraduate and undergraduate research students. It seeks to encourage and support non-academics to pursue and develop their interests in punk scholarship through a range of different events. 

Her research on different aspects of punk utilises the analytical tools of Implicit Religion to explore animal activism; sound; protest; musical expression;  salvation; orientalism and enchantment. She makes use of qualitative methods in ethnographies as well as autoethnography. Her current research project is focused on marginalisation within punk curation and exhibits. It deploys Implicit Religion to consider how and why women, punks of colour, disabled punks and LGBTQAI+ punks are re-presented [sic] within the subculture and broader cultural events such as museum exhibits.